The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander 19 June 2014 5:30pm Michelle Alexander June 19, 2014 6:30pm

As the United States celebrates the nation’s “triumph over race” with the election of Barack Obama, the majority of young black men in major American cities are locked behind bars or have been labeled felons for life. Although Jim Crow laws have been wiped off the books, an astounding percentage of the African American community remains trapped in a subordinate status – much like their grandparents before them.” In this incisive critique, former litigator-turned-legal-scholar Michelle Alexander provocatively argues that we have not ended racial caste in America: we have simply redesigned it. Alexander shows that, by targeting black men and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control, even as it formally adheres to the principle of color blindness. The New Jim Crow challenges the civil rights community – and all of us – to place mass incarceration at the forefront of a new movement for racial justice in America.

 

Juneteenth

Celebrates the liberation of black American slaves in Texas on June 19, 1865

by Caitlin Helfrich
Map of Texas

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Origins

On June 19, 1865, the Union General Gordon Granger rode into Galveston, Tex., to inform inhabitants of the Civil War’s end two months earlier. Two and a half years after Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, Granger’s General Order Number 3 finally freed the last 250,000 slaves whose bondage, due to the minimal Union presence in the region, had been essentially unaffected by Lincoln’s efforts. June 19th—which was quickly shortened to “Juneteenth” among celebrants—has become the African-American addendum to our national Independence Day, for, as Juneteenth jubilees remind us, the Emancipation Proclamation did not bring about emancipation, and the prevailing portrayal of Independence Day ignores the ignominious incidence of slavery entirely.

Evolution

Observance of Juneteenth has traditionally tended towards church-centered celebrations featuring food, fun, and a focus on self-improvement and education by guest speakers. Although initially associated with Texas and other Southern states, the Civil Rights Era and the Poor People’s March to Washington in 1968, in particular, helped spread the tradition all across America—to the extent that Milwaukee and Minneapolis now host two of the largest Juneteenth celebrations in the nation.

Juneteenth Today

The state of Texas made Juneteenth an official holiday on Jan. 1, 1980, and became the first to grant it government recognition. Several states have since issued proclamations recognizing the holiday, but the Lone Star State remains alone in granting it full state holiday status, a day when government employees have the day off. Nonetheless, supporters and celebrants of Juneteenth continue to grow in number and in diversity; today, Juneteenth is promoted not only as a commemoration of African-American freedom, but as an example and encouragement of self-development and respect for all cultures.

Read more: Juneteenth History, Info: Emancipation Day — Celebration Abolition of Slavery | Infoplease.com http://www.infoplease.com/spot/juneteenth1.html#ixzz2uTTUWkFX

Hello IYBC,

Please show your support on 19 June 2014 5:30pm at (TBA)

Brian Mckinney will facilitate “The New Jim Crow” Mass Incarceration In The Age Of Color Blindness by Michelle Alexander. Very Ironic that we will be discussing this book on June 19, 2014 which is called “Juneteenth” Emancipation Proclamation Day in which slaves were free in the State Of Texas, this is celebrated in all states today, this is day of Independence for Black People.

Are we really free?

 

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" Mother Teresa didn't walk around complaining about her thighs she had love to give"
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